Speed dating psychology research

Published online 2 June Nature doi: Matt Kaplan. Speed dating is not just popular among those looking for romance. Psychologists have worked out that they can get swarms of student participants in mate-choice studies by offering speed-dating opportunities on university campuses in return for the right to analyse the dating behaviour during the events. A study in Psychological Science points out that chivalric behaviour created by the speed-dating experience may be skewing the data 1.

Psychology Research Speed Dating

I recently found an article in the New York Times that talks about a speed dating study that is going to be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Psychological Science. Given the usual state of science journalism, the fact that the article includes links that let me find a press release about the upcoming paper and a page PDF file containing the paper itself was very helpful.

According to most studies and in accordance with popular stereotypes, men are normally less selective than women when it comes to evaluating potential romantic partners - in general, it appears that men are more likely to want to date any given woman than women are to want to date any given man. In a typical speed dating experiment, men and women rate potential partners as either a "yes" or a "no" depending on whether or not they want to see that person again.

Men almost always rate a larger percentage of women as a "yes" than women do men, and, according to this paper, this is a fairly robust finding that generalizes over many different contexts. The usual explanation of this phenomena is based on evolutionary psychology: If there were a biological, genetic basis for this tendency, it should be difficult to come up with an experimental setup in which women are less selective and men are more selective.

However, that's not the case at all. This study demonstrates that a small, seemingly trivial change in the speed dating ritual results in a partial reversal of the normal results. You see, in practically every speed dating setup, when it is time to interact with a new partner, men physically leave their seat and move to the table where the next woman is sitting, while the women remain seated and wait for the men to approach them. The authors of this study had the men remain still and had the women change seats, and found that this was all it took to wipe away the usual pattern: I suggest that you go read the paper, or at least the press release, yourself; my summary doesn't really do it justice, and I'm leaving the implications for the evolutionary psychology-based analysis of gender as an exercise for the reader.

Having had some more time to look over the study, I think I should point out that it wasn't a complete reversal of the usual gender behavior: Sitters of both genders were equally selective. An interesting speed dating study.

New Stanford research on speed dating examines what makes couples Is it all things that are psychological or in my head or is there actually. Is speed dating worth the awkwardness? New research reveals the chances of mating and relating after a speed dating event. The researchers.

What happens when people meet potential romantic partners? What are the behavioral, perceptual and decision processes that determine whether two persons will feel attracted to each other and finally fall in love? And how do people differ in these processes? A total of heterosexual participants who were currently looking for a romantic partner were invited to one of 42 speed-dating events in our laboratory. At each speed-dating event, 5 female and 5 male participants had 3-minute videotaped speed-dates with each participant of the opposite sex, resulting in 25 speed-dates per event.

The modern world provides two new ways to find love — online matchmaking and speed dating. In the last few years, these methods have moved from a last resort for the loveless to a more accepted way for millions to try to meet their mates.

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“Date me for Science” speed-dating study

Gary W. Lewandowski Jr. Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence. On a TV show or in a movie, if a guy and a girl are at a party and one approaches the other to strike up a conversation, chances are that it was the guy who approached the girl. On Sadie Hawkins Day traditionally observed in early November or at a Sadie Hawkins Dance, women have the opportunity to invert social convention by asking men out on a date or to a dance. Speed dating is a structured way for daters to meet a lot of people quickly.

Speed dating: Why are women more choosy?

Stanford researchers analyze the encounters of men and women during four-minute speed dates to find out what makes couples feel connected. Stanford researchers studying how meaningful bonds are formed analyzed the conversations of heterosexual couples during speed dating encounters. Successful dates, the paper notes, were associated with women being the focal point and engaged in the conversation, and men demonstrating alignment with and understanding of the women. That's the question at the heart of new research by Stanford scholars Dan McFarland and Dan Jurafsky that looks at how meaningful bonds are formed. McFarland, a sociologist at Stanford's Graduate School of Education , and Jurafsky, a computational linguist, analyzed the conversations of heterosexual couples during speed dating encounters to find out why some people felt a sense of connection after the meeting and others didn't. Their paper, "Making the Connection: McFarland said much of the literature on social bonding points to characteristics — traits, status, attributes, motivation, experiences — as reasons why people connect. But, he said, those explanations ignore or downplay the role of communication. There is a great deal of uncertainty, the paper notes, about the meaning of signals we send to other people, and how that plays into forging interpersonal connections. Is it all things that are psychological or in my head or is there actually something in how we hit it off?

Jump to navigation. It takes people less than a second to start formulating explanations for why men and women are so different when it comes to romantic relationships.

I recently found an article in the New York Times that talks about a speed dating study that is going to be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Psychological Science. Given the usual state of science journalism, the fact that the article includes links that let me find a press release about the upcoming paper and a page PDF file containing the paper itself was very helpful. According to most studies and in accordance with popular stereotypes, men are normally less selective than women when it comes to evaluating potential romantic partners - in general, it appears that men are more likely to want to date any given woman than women are to want to date any given man.

Modern Love: Scientific Insights from 21st Century Dating

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An interesting speed dating study

Speed daters who romantically desired most of their potential partners were rejected quickly and overwhelmingly, according to a new Northwestern University study. Conventional wisdom has long taught that one of the best ways to get someone to like you is to make it clear that you like them. Now researchers have discovered that this law of reciprocity is in dire need of an asterisk in the domain of romantic attraction. The more you tend to experience romantic desire for all the potential romantic partners you meet, the study shows, the less likely it is that they will desire you in return. Think too desperate, too indiscriminate. In contrast, when you desire a potential partner above and beyond your other options, only then is your desire likely to be reciprocated.

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