Writing an online dating profile while mentally ill

On one hand, I would like to let somebody know as early as possible so that they are able to make a decision about whether they feel comfortable being in a relationship with someone that needs a lot of support, as well as avoiding the possibility that somebody begins to feel emotionally attached but then feels hurt when they learn that I may not feel emotionally ready to do all the things they want me to do with them. So what do you think dude? Should I be waiting for a certain level of emotional intimacy before telling someone? Get it out of the way by making light of my situation and writing an amusing anecdote about it on my dating profiles?

Ask Dr. NerdLove: When Do I Disclose My Mental Illness?

Online dating can be tough no matter who you are or what kind of baggage you're carrying. I have bipolar depression , which most of the time feels like regular depression. I treat it with a combination of medications and talk therapy. Being a woman with bipolar depression can especially conjure up stereotypes that I am an unpredictable, life-ruining sex fiend. Licensed psychotherapist Dr. Until recently, I had never felt completely comfortable sharing my mental health struggles with partners.

After coming out of a recent episode of hypomania —a period of abnormally elevated mood and hyper-activity that that can end in a depressive comedown—and finally finding a medication that really helps, I realized how much bipolar depression might have been impacting my romantic life. When I re-downloaded Tinder , I made my profile brutally honest about my struggles with mental health. That way I could face any potential stigma head on and weed out anyone who might have a negative reaction later on.

I asked a few of my matches how they felt about the information I shared in my profile and how they might feel about dating someone with a mental illness. I date men and women, but the responses I received were overwhelmingly from men. I like full disclosure. People usually hide that because of stigma, so it was interesting.

I work in mental health. But breaking the stigma is what we should be doing. Some of my matches even shared some of their own experiences with mental health conditions. But others seemed to just want someone to talk to who shared a sense of the challenges of living with mental health issues. I am too. Quite the opposite. In my experience, the only thing girls like better than a bad boy is a reformed bad boy. As I connected with more matches, I found that some guys seemed to be interested in me specifically because of my mental health conditions.

Passionate, wild, confident. Not prudish. Yvonne Thomas , Ph. If you are really mean, that would make it hard. Do you find mental illness scary? A bit, yeah. How do you manage with that? What kind of consequences does that have on a relationship? I would for once like a simple, nice relationship. Something easy. Not crazy stuff. I feel happy and in good health. Well, a lot of people live with some form of mental illness.

Do you not think people with mental illness can have healthy dating lives? I think at the beginning yeah. Everything is gonna be alright. What illnesses do you have? Change of mood? Bad and good? It looks scary. I think my ex was bipolar, too. She was mean sometimes and nice another time I was always lost with her. Does depression scare you? Yeah depression is scary.

Talking openly about mental health can be uncomfortable, but perpetuating false assumptions and fear is way worse. Better yet, talking with a therapist of their own could help get to the heart of why mental illness scares them. People with mental health concerns can, and often do, lead healthy, fulfilling romantic lives. But Dr. Thomas said that forming new relationships requires extra sensitivity and awareness of how to avoid misunderstandings and confusion.

You deserve that. Mental conditions or not. Sign up for our newsletter to get the best of VICE delivered to your inbox daily. Follow Sofia on Twitter. Sign up for the best of VICE, delivered to your inbox daily. My bipolar depression isn't something I try to hide, but I wanted to face the potential stigma head on. Newsletters are the new newsletters.

Online dating can be tough no matter who you are or what kind of baggage you' re carrying. I have bipolar When I re-downloaded Tinder, I made my profile brutally honest about my struggles with mental health. That way I. When it came to writing my profile on vacuumfurnacedesign.com I had an interesting predicament . How open should I be about my mental illness? I actually.

A mental illness. And online dating? They are not able to see you or your personality. And I am not my illness. It is a part of me, but there is a whole lot more to me as a person.

With more and more people relying on online dating to meet a partner, the act of online dating also gets studied more and more.

When I joined the online dating scene in , I strategically crafted my profile with the right keywords, phrases, and photos that I thought would grant me the best chance of landing a date, and hopefully, a long-term relationship that would end in marriage. Dating apps like Bumble represent some of the highest-grossing social experiences in app stores worldwide.

Top tips to stay badass while online dating

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies from which MoneyCrashers. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. Advertiser partners include American Express, Chase, U. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others. Being divorced for several years, I have tried my hand at online dating , experimenting with a number of different sites, and I know from experience that for someone new to the process, it can be rather intimidating and confusing.

‘So, you know I have bipolar?’ – the perils of dating with a mental health problem

Online dating can be tough no matter who you are or what kind of baggage you're carrying. I have bipolar depression , which most of the time feels like regular depression. I treat it with a combination of medications and talk therapy. Being a woman with bipolar depression can especially conjure up stereotypes that I am an unpredictable, life-ruining sex fiend. Licensed psychotherapist Dr. Until recently, I had never felt completely comfortable sharing my mental health struggles with partners. After coming out of a recent episode of hypomania —a period of abnormally elevated mood and hyper-activity that that can end in a depressive comedown—and finally finding a medication that really helps, I realized how much bipolar depression might have been impacting my romantic life. When I re-downloaded Tinder , I made my profile brutally honest about my struggles with mental health. That way I could face any potential stigma head on and weed out anyone who might have a negative reaction later on. I asked a few of my matches how they felt about the information I shared in my profile and how they might feel about dating someone with a mental illness.

When they find out about it, will they be more circumspect?

Should you post pictures of yourself in a wheelchair? How do you avoid being contacted by people who are more interested in asking you questions than actually dating you? If so, when? It seems to come down to this:

When Your Dating Profile Includes Mental Illness

Before you can post or reply in these forums, please join our online community. I mean, what alternative do I have, I'm unsocial and social anxiety and useless conversationalist. Idk, I hate competition like this, in social circumstances, I don't compare to any1 else, I'm always last choice, if choice at all I've only ever gotten rejected asking women out so until sone1 proves to me otherwise, I'm not relationship material, so why bother. You want to know something interesting? A friend and I were talking of putting this issue up for discussion as a new thread last night! And here you are You sound like a sensitive and caring person who only wants what we all want; to find, be loved by, and to love a kindred spirit. Someone to call friend, lover and life partner. The trials and tribulations we go thru trying to find that perfect 'connection' with another like minded soul, can flatten even the strongest of us. Whether that be physically, emotionally, mentally or spiritually.

Dating in the Internet World with Mental Illness

I first created an OKCupid account in , and for nearly five years, online dating and I had a tumultuous, on-and-off relationship. Then, in December of , I decided I would take a break from online dating—and that unlike my previous "breaks," this one would last for more than a few weeks. It's actually ended up lasting a year because after seven months, I met someone—and it was IRL. The biggest reason I had for deleting my dating apps was just an insufficient return on investment. Whether because we didn't have much in common or we weren't willing to put in much effort, my conversations rarely left the texting stage. When they did, second dates were rare and thirds were almost unheard of.

Dating in the Internet World with Mental Illness

And guess what? Photo credit: Nicole for Hey Saturday, London. One of the most negative things about social media is the tendency to compare yourself to others. Everyone else appears to be having a great social life, going on great dates, or is happily coupled up with a perfect relationship. Your dating journey is unique and the way you are doing it is just fine.

How Dating Apps Can Affect Your Mental Health, According To Experts

From Lady Gaga to Serena Williams, tell us which looks you loved. Navigating the dating scene is tricky for anyone — but how is it different when you have a mental condition like bipolar or schizophrenia? Erik Mace for Yahoo Health. Christina Bruni seems to have it all. She owns her own co-op, has a gym-toned body and striking good looks, and a career as a librarian.

Life as a single person offers many rewards, such as being free to pursue your own hobbies and interests, learning how to enjoy your own company, and appreciating the quiet moments of solitude. For many of us, our emotional baggage can make finding the right romantic partner a difficult journey. Perhaps you grew up in a household where there was no role model of a solid, healthy relationship and you doubt that such a thing even exists. You could be attracted to the wrong type of person or keep making the same bad choices over and over, due to an unresolved issue from your past. Whatever the case may be, you can overcome your obstacles and find a healthy romantic relationship.

He was nerdy, clean-cut, and very easy on the eyes. The bright text stopped me in my tracks. A part of me gets it. Many people think of mental illness in extremes and stereotypes, i. As someone who lives with dysthymia, or persistent mild depression, I struggle against this stigma. In the morning I wake up and take a pill to help with my anxiety.

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